C++ Fast Track for Games Programming Part 2: The Template

C++ Fast-track

C++ Fast-track for Games Programming Part 2: The Template

As you noticed in the first article, setting up a project in Visual Studio can be quite a task. And we didn’t (nearly) touch all the settings that you can adjust for a project either. To make your life a bit easier, we will use a project template from now on. This template is simply a directory that contains all the files that you need, with all the settings tuned just right for the kind of programs that we will be building in this series. The template also contains a bit of code that you need for most projects, so that you don’t have to type it yourself. This code aims to take away the platform specific things from you; i.e. it opens a window, lets you draw to it, and updates it for you. Sounds simple, but really it isn’t. Windows operating system can be quite a nightmare to deal with properly, and since that’s just not the core of game development, we felt it’s best to take care of that once and for all. The result is the template.
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C++ Fast Track for Games Programming Part 1: Getting Started

C++ Fast Track

C++ Fast Track for Games Programming Part 1: Getting Started

Welcome to the first article in the Programming C++ Fast Track tutorial series! These tutorials are designed to take you from zero to a decent entry level in a somewhat smooth fashion. We start at the absolute basics: all that you need to get started is a laptop or PC, a fair bit of time, and quite a bit of dedication.

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Volume Tiled Forward Shading

Volume Tiled Forward Shading

Volume Tiled Forward Shading

In this post, Volume Tiled Forward Shading rendering is described. Volume Tiled Forward Shading is based on Tiled and Clustered Forward Shading described by Ola Olsson et. al. [13][20]. Similar to Clustered Shading, Volume Tiled Forward Shading builds a 3D grid of volume tiles (clusters) and assigns the lights in the scene to the volumes tiles. Only the lights that are intersecting with the volume tile for the current pixel need to be considered during shading. By sorting the lights into volume tiles, the performance of the shading stage can be greatly improved. By building a Bounding Volume Hierarchy (BVH) over the lights in the scene, the performance of the light assignment to tiles phase can also be improved. The Volume Tiled Forward Shading technique combined with the BVH optimization allows for millions of light sources to be active in the scene.

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Physics in Unity

Physics in Unity

Physics in Unity

In this article, I will introduce the reader to the Physics system used in the Unity game engine. First, I will introduce the Physic Material Asset that is used to define physics properties for collider surfaces. I will also introduce Colliders and talk about the different kinds of Collider types you can create. The Rigidbody component is absolutely essential for performing physics simulations on GameObjects. I will show you how you can create a Rigidbody GameObject that can be user controlled. I will also talk about the Character Controller component that is provided by Unity to control upright characters. And finally, I will introduce the different Joints that are available in Unity.

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Rendering and Special Effects in Unity 3.5

Lightmapping

Lightmapping

In this article, I will introduce the reader to the different rendering components in Unity. I will introduce the Camera component as well as the different lighting components that are available. I will also talk about materials in Unity and introduce you to a few of the shaders that are available. And finally, I will also introduce light-mapping in Unity.

If you haven’t used Unity before, you can refer to my previous article titled “Introduction to Unity” available here: https://www.3dgep.com/?p=3246.

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Scripting in Unity

Unity - Scripting

Unity – Scripting

In this article, I will introduce you to scripting in Unity 3.5. Unity is a powerful game editor that only limits you to what you can imagine. Scripting is where the magic happens which will bring your games to life. I assume the reader is familiar the Unity interface, if not you can refer to my previous article titled Introduction to Unity (https://www.3dgep.com/?p=3246).

This article is intended for designers and artists who have no previous programming experience. For this reason, I will go into details about JavaScript syntax that the experienced programmer may find boring.

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Introduction to Unity 3.5

Unity

Unity

In this article, I will introduce you to the Unity game editor. Unity is a tool for creating and deploying games to PC, consoles, web and mobile devices. In this post, I will go through the steps to get Unity installed on your computer and I will introduce you to the basic features of Unity. Unity makes it easy for anyone to get started making games. You will not need any previous game development experience to follow these articles but by the end, you will be prepared to start making your own games like a professional!

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Transformation and Lighting in Cg 3.1

Lighting with Cg 3.1

Lighting with Cg 3.1

In this article I will demonstrate how to implement a basic lighting model using the Cg shader language. If you are unfamiliar with using Cg in your own applications, then please refer to my previous article titled Introduction to Shader Programming with Cg 3.1.

This article is an updated version of the previous article titled Transformation and Lighting in Cg. In this article, I will not use any deprecated features of OpenGL. I will only use the core OpenGL 3.1 API.

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Rendering Primitives with OpenGL

Rendering Primitives

Rendering Primitives

In this article, I will examine multiple methods for rendering primitives in OpenGL. The first method I will look at is using immediate-mode rendering to render simple primitives in 3D. Another method of rending primitives in OpenGL uses vertex arrays. And finally I will also examine the use of display lists to generate a set of render calls that can be executed at another point in time. The reader is expected to have a basic understanding of programming techniques in C++. If you want to know how you can get started with OpenGL, you can refer to my previous article titled [Introduction to OpenGL].

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