Volume Tiled Forward Shading

Volume Tiled Forward Shading

Volume Tiled Forward Shading

In this post, Volume Tiled Forward Shading rendering is described. Volume Tiled Forward Shading is based on Tiled and Clustered Forward Shading described by Ola Olsson et. al. [13][20]. Similar to Clustered Shading, Volume Tiled Forward Shading builds a 3D grid of volume tiles (clusters) and assigns the lights in the scene to the volumes tiles. Only the lights that are intersecting with the volume tile for the current pixel need to be considered during shading. By sorting the lights into volume tiles, the performance of the shading stage can be greatly improved. By building a Bounding Volume Hierarchy (BVH) over the lights in the scene, the performance of the light assignment to tiles phase can also be improved. The Volume Tiled Forward Shading technique combined with the BVH optimization allows for millions of light sources to be active in the scene.

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Forward vs Deferred vs Forward+ Rendering with DirectX 11

Forward+ with HLSL

Forward+ with HLSL

In this article, I will analyze and compare three rendering algorithms:

  1. Forward Rendering
  2. Deferred Shading
  3. Forward+ (Tiled Forward Rendering)

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Texturing and Lighting in DirectX 11

DirectX 11 Texturing and Lighting

DirectX 11 Texturing and Lighting

In this article I will discuss texture and lighting in DirectX 11 using HLSL shaders.

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Introduction to DirectX 11

DirectX

DirectX

In this article, I will introduce the reader to DirectX 11. We will create a simple demo application that can be used to create more complex DirectX examples and demos. After reading this article, you should be able to create a DirectX application and render geometry using a simple vertex shader and pixel shader.

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Texturing and Lighting with OpenGL and GLSL

OpenGL GLSL Texturing and Lighting

OpenGL GLSL Texturing and Lighting

In this article I will demonstrate how to apply 2D textures to your 3D models. I will also show how to define lights that are used to illuminate the objects in your scene.
I assume that the reader has a basic knowledge of C++ and how to create and compile C++ programs. If you have never created an OpenGL program, then I suggest that you read my previous article titled [Introduction to OpenGL and GLSL] before continuing with this article.

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Introduction to OpenGL and GLSL

OpenGL

OpenGL

In this article I will introduce the reader to the OpenGL rendering API (application programming interface). I will also introduce GLSL (OpenGL Shading Language). We will create a simple vertex shader and fragment shader that can be used to render very basic 3D primitives. By the end of this article you will know how to create a simple OpenGL application and render 3D objects using shaders.

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